Big numbers from the aluminum block foundation aside, the LS platform is actually the perfect motor to have given the impending changes in the future of this sport. "In looking forward, we are hearing more favorable rumbles regarding the acceptance of EFI in stock car racing," says Martens. "Racers are very skeptical of change and especially of electronic voodoo that may be imposed on them by sanctioning bodies. If they ever have a chance to run an EFI system and change the tune-up on the fly because of varying conditions, they'll never look back. When was the last time you went out in the morning and said, "I wish had a carbureted car to drive to work today?" Seriously, it will take a long time for this to trickle down to the grassroots level, but by using the LS3 architecture, we're ready to convert when, and if, racer demand dictates."

Beyond the coil packs and ECU, the CT525 is largely a stock off-the-shelf-motor, even the bigger cam and camshaft system is borrowed from the '06 LS2 also found in the Corvette and features a three-bolt sprocket mounting and design. In addition to the cam design, the timing chain dampener is an older style part instead of the LS3-style chain tensioner.

One of the few aftermarket parts on this engine is the oil pan, a 6-quart unit specially designed for circle track racing. It features a righthand side kick-out with five integral trap doors and uses a 7/8-inch pickup tube. While we're on the subject of oil, the CT525 requires two additional items; a remote oil filter and a remote oil cooler. For the filter, GM located two -10 AN fittings on the left rear of the pan. The front fitting is the feed from the engine oil pump while the rear pan fitting feeds the engine. GM also recommends that you use a large capacity filter that has a minimum flow capacity of 10 gph flow capacity and 25 micron filtration rating.

As far as the oil cooler goes, you should look for one at least 7x14 inches with a minimum flow of 10 gpm and a -10 AN inlet size. GM recommends the cooler be mounted after the oil filter, making it the last part oil sees before entering the engine. This is contrary to the advice many engine builders give that being the oil filter should be the last part oil sees before entering the engine thereby ensuring there are no contaminents in the oil. The GM recommendation encouraged us to do a little research and we found that the legendary Smokey Yunick investigated both options.

"Smokey's argument was once the oil is filtered, reducing its temperature creates an opportunity to pull more heat out of the valvetrain while not at the expense of good lubrication," said CT's resident engine guru Jim McFarland who worked closely with Yunick for many years. "In my experience, valvesprings rely heavily on cooling from circulated oil. If memory serves, the two greatest contributors to oil temperature are the oil pump (shearing action of spur gears) and valvesprings. So, if the device used to reduce post-filter oil temperature doesn't introduce any possibilities for lubricant contamination, Smokey felt the approach had some merit." Where you mount your oil cooler, if you run one, on any engine is up to you but Smokey's theory certainly warrants consideration. Just be sure that cooler is contaminent free.

"Smokey's argument was once the oil is filtered, reducing its temperature creates an opportunity to pull more heat out of the valvetrain while not at the expense of good lubrication," said CT's resident engine guru Jim McFarland who worked closely with Yunick for many years. "In my experience, valvesprings rely heavily on cooling from circulated oil. If memory serves, the two greatest contributors to oil temperature are the oil pump (shearing action of spur gears) and valvesprings. So, if the device used to reduce post-filter oil temperature doesn't introduce any possibilities for lubricant contamination, Smokey felt the approach had some merit." Where you mount your oil cooler, if you run one, on any engine is up to you but Smokey's theory certainly warrants consideration. Just be sure that cooler is contaminent free.

Back to the 525, GM engineers added additional support to the crankshaft dampener by adding a 3/16-inch dowel pin to retain the dampener in position. However, the motor does not have a thermostat, instead two restrictor plugs are installed in the water-pump housing. One (3/16-inch hole) is installed in place of the thermostat, and the other (3/4-inch hole) is installed in the water-pump outlet fitting. You may need to alter these holes based on your chosen cooling system, which like most oval track applications will require a surge or expansion tank with an air bleed.